Cavalry Operations in the Ancient Greek World

by Robert E. Gaebel

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

Written in English
Cover of: Cavalry Operations in the Ancient Greek World | Robert E. Gaebel
Published: Pages: 345 Downloads: 516
Share This

Subjects:

  • European history: BCE to c 500 CE,
  • Military - Strategy,
  • History - Military / War,
  • Hellenic languages,
  • Literary Criticism,
  • Ancient Greece,
  • Ancient - Greece,
  • Military - Other,
  • Europe - Greece,
  • Ancient and Classical
The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages345
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7939967M
ISBN 100806134445
ISBN 109780806134444
OCLC/WorldCa149140909

Did the ancient Greeks have nobles and aristocrats? [True - even in democratic Athens the aristocrats remained a force to be reckoned with] Was the secret of ancient Greece. Learn test ancient civilizations world history chapter 9 with free interactive flashcards. Choose from different sets of test ancient civilizations world history chapter 9 flashcards on Quizlet. Chapter 3, "Cavalry Warfare, c", gives a good account of what cavalry did actually achieve in a world in which battles were actually decided by heavy infantry. In "Independent Operations" (pp) the cavalry proved its defensive and offensive worth, both by preventing the enemy from dispersing in order to do the maximum damage to. Revised hardcover edition: by David Sacks and Lisa R. Brody, published by Facts On File, , ISBN , pages, $ Out of print: hardcover edition by David Sacks, published by Facts On File. Paperback edition: titled A Dictionary of the Ancient Greek World, Oxford University Press, , ISBN , pages, $ The book consists of .

The other World War I development was that of motorized armored vehicles such as the tank. The use of the tank as the new cavalry of the modern age was advocated by B. H. Liddell Hart, Charles de Gaulle, and J. F. C. Fuller (–) in the interwar period. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle . Media in category "Cavalry of ancient Greece" The following 31 files are in this category, out of 31 total. - Piraeus Arch. Museum, Athens - Stele for Panchares - Photo by Giovanni Dall'Orto, Nov 14 jpg 2, × 1,; KB. Ancient Greece by Anne Pearson Pearson, Anne. Eyewitness Ancient Pub., Call Number: PEA Synopsis: Many of our Western traditions and legends come from ancient Greece, including the stories of Hercules, the greatest strong-man ever t Greece comes alive in this book of gods and goddesses, arts, family life, and myths that still influence .

Gaebel traces the operational use of cavalry in the ancient Greek world from circa to B.C., the end of Greek and Macedonian independence. In a blog posted some months ago (Why Social Scientists Need to Study War) I argued that warfare is one of the most important forces in social evolution and that it deserves a careful study. In this and following blogs I’d like to continue this line of reasoning. The main question I am interested in is the interrelations between warfare and the evolution of complex societies.

Cavalry Operations in the Ancient Greek World by Robert E. Gaebel Download PDF EPUB FB2

Cavalry Operations in the Ancient Greek World by Robert E. Gaebel is a fine and useful book for people who love the history of cavalry and their horses.

I gave it four stars rather than five because the treatment of cavalry before the time of the Companion Cavalry was light, and I felt that the Thebans and especially Pelopidas, arguably the first great cavalry commander, Cited by: Gaebel traces the operational use of cavalry in the ancient Greek world from circa to B.C., the end of Greek and Macedonian independence.

Emphasizing the Greek and Hellenistic periods ( B.C.), he provides information about the military use of horses in the eastern Mediterranean, 3/5. Cavalry Operations in the Ancient Greek World by Robert E. Gaebel () [Robert E. Gaebel] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Cavalry Operations in the Ancient Greek World by Robert E. Gaebel ()/5(4). In this comprehensive narrative, Robert E. Gaebel challenges conventional views of cavalry operations in the Greek world.

Applying both military and historical perspectives, Gaebel shows that until the death of Alexander the Great in b.c., cavalry played a larger role than is commonly recognized. Gaebel traces the operational use of cavalry in the ancient Greek world from circa to B.C., the end of Greek and Macedonian independence.

Emphasizing the Greek and Hellenistic periods ( B.C.), he provides information about the military use of horses in the eastern Mediterranean, Greek stable management and horse care, and broad battlefield Pages: Gaebel traces the operational use of cavalry in the ancient Greek world from circa to B.C., the end of Greek and Macedonian independence.

Emphasizing the Greek and Hellenistic periods ( B.C.), he provides information about the military use of horses in the eastern Mediterranean, 4/5(1).

Robert E. Gaebel has provided a complete history of the use of cavalry in ancient warfare from the first appearance of the horse in the Ancient Near East and Greece until the Second Punic War. The most valuable aspects of the book are its author's experience as a classical historian and an equestrian.

Cavalry Operations in the Ancient Greek World. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, xiv + pp. $, paper, ISBN Reviewed by Kevin K. Carroll Published on H-War (April, ) Cavalry in the Ancient Greek World In the introduction to his book, Gaebel makes the comment that "until recently there were no.

seen that cavalry operations played a significant role in various aspects of the Greek's military endeavors. 1 In fact, the art of modern horsemanship owes its Author: Lindsey Carrier. Many believe that the cavalry initially was used more in the role of scouts, as the tradition of the time wanted the aristocratic charioteers to dominate the battlefield and the small Greek horses could not carry armored men.

But since the beginning of larger horses appearance, armored horsemen began to make their presence felt in battlefield. Hippeis (Ancient Greek: ἱππεῖς, singular ἱππεύς, hippeus) is a Greek term for cavalry. In ancient Athenian society, after the political reforms of Solon, the hippeus was the second highest of the four social classes.

It was composed of men who had. ✏Cavalry Operations in the Ancient Greek World Book Summary: In this comprehensive narrative, Robert E. Gaebel challenges conventional views of cavalry operations in the Greek world.

WORLEY: Hippeis. The Cavalry of Ancient Greece. (History and Warfare.) Pp. xiii+, 27 figs. Boulder, San Francisco, Oxford: Westview Press, Inc., Cased. The main part of this book is divided into four chapters. In the first S. reviews the evidence for the maintenance of cavalry by the various states of Greece during the.

Cavalry (from the French word cavalerie, itself derived from "cheval" meaning "horse") are soldiers or warriors who fight mounted on y were historically the most mobile of the combat individual soldier in the cavalry is known by a number of designations such as cavalryman, horseman, trooper, or designation of cavalry was not usually.

Cavalry in the Ancient Greek World Cavalry in the Ancient Greek World In the introduction to his book, Gaebel makes the comment that "until recently there were no book-length treatments of ancient Greek Cavalry" (p.

He then mentions three books published between and Athenian operations in Thessaly and Chalcidian Thrace illustrate the critical role cavalry played in early Greek warfare. Although Athens likely began to strengthen its cavalry forces after the Persian Wars, it continued to rely on the Thessalians.

Warfare in the Classical World: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of Weapons, Warriors, and Warfare in the Ancient Civilizations of Greece and Rome (Paperback) by John Warry. Carey, Brian Todd. Warfare in the Ancient ey: Pen & Sword Military, pages.

In Warfare in the Ancient World, Brian Todd Carey has produced a collection of 26 ancient battles, which serve as a fine introduction to the between the battles, Carey mixes in descriptions of the rise and fall of empires and the evolution of open-field battle.

WBO Student Loading. This book is the first to examine how classical Greek cavalry actually operated on the battlefield. It looks at its prime characteristics, including mobility, protection, armament, training, leadership, flexibility, and motivation.

Until now, it was generally assumed that ancient Greek cavalry was subordinated to the infantry because it was less effective in battle. Robert E. Gaebel, Cavalry Operations in the Ancient Greek World, University of Oklahoma Press (→ISBN), page The only Boeotian troops that did continue to fight — the light infantry attached to the victorious cavalry — worked their way over to the Athenians on the right, where most of them were killed.

In ancient Egyptian society chariotry stood as an independent unit in the King’s military ts are thought to have been first used as a weapon in Egypt by the Hyksos in the 16th century BC, though investigation of materials long held in the Tahrir Square Egyptian Museum has potentially revealed the presence of chariots as early as the Old Kingdom (c.

ancient battle accounts to consideration of what men and their tools are capable of in the physical world, to what he called ‘the reality of the thing’.6 If there is less use of Sachkritik in present studies of the ancient world at war, it is not so much attributable to File Size: KB.

The Greek for cavalry is ιππικό. Find more Greek words at. Lancearii or Antesignani: The Roman light cavalry, the Equites Legionis was generally this type of trooper.; Conttarii: These troop types were created under the reign of Trajan probably to counter the cavalry of the Sarmatian people and carried the heavy lance (contus).; Cataphractii or Clibanarii: This heavy cavalry was developed in the east and probably first appeared in.

By BC, the use of cavalry had spread to Europe, and there were cavalry in ancient Greece and Rome. Warfare in ancient Greece Roman army and soldiers. In ancient Greece and Rome, the way you knew a man was rich was that he owned expensive war horses and could be in the cavalry.

Now hear me out here. This is a tactic that, during the Middle Ages, often meant the difference between defeat and victory.

It could topple nations, end empires and halt even the most indomitable invader. I’m talking of course, about STANDING STIL. Browsing subject area: World War, (Include extended shelves) You can also browse an alphabetical list from this subject or from: World War, The cavalry generally came in on the sides and rear of the phalanx.

The Greeks learned to support their phalanxes with cavalry squadrons of their own. Experiences gained in foreign adventures contributed to development of Athenian cavalry.

photo by Carol Duff. Excerpt: The phalanx (Ancient Greek: Modern Greek: ph langa) (plural phalanxes or phalanges; Ancient and Modern Greek: ph langes) is a rectangular mass military formation, usually composed entirely of heavy infantry armed with spears, pikes, sarissas, or similar weapons.

In Daughters of Gaia, Bella Vivante explores women’s lives in four ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean: Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome. Looking at this era with a women-centered perspective, Vivante highlights women’s agency and explains the social, political, and cultural factors that fostered female : Bella Vivante.The Role of Horses in Ancient Greece by: Sarah Kline Horses have been an important, if not vital, part of most great societies.

This fact was no less true in Ancient Greek society where horses were held on a level just below the gods. But even with the scanty armor the cavalry of Ancient Greek used for it’s horses, the cavalry was.In comparison with the cavalry of be ancient world the knightly cavalry had lost its mobility and could not pursue the enemy.

In the army of the ancient Russian state (ninth and tenth centuries) the cavalry was represented by the prince’s retinue, which was numerically smaller than the unmounted city and village militia.